Digital Studies Symposium: Rachel Mayeri

Rachel Mayeri is a video and installation artist whose work often deals with the intersection of science, art, and society. Her previous video work includes The Anatomical Theater of Peter the Great (1999), animations for Biospheria: An Environmental Opera (2001), and The Electropathic Sanitarium (1992). Mayeri’s work has been screened nationally and internationally, including Pacific Film Archive, P.S.1/MOMA and ZKM. She has received grants from Creative Capital, the Getty Institute, and the California Council on the Humanities. She is Assistant Professor of Media Studies at Harvey Mudd College and curates art and media events in Los Angeles.

Mayeri is also the founder of Soft Science, a collection of video-curiosities created by artists and scientists. Artists have been mining science for years – in diverse experiments with icky substances, authority figures, and the ever-elusive idea of Reason. This unique program includes digital movies by biologists alongside contemporary video art.The talk begins at 7:00 and is free and open to students, faculty, and the general public.

About the Symposium

The Digital Studies Symposium is designed to introduce participants to diverse scholarly media-based production. The speakers in this series are artists, programmers, scholars and designers, and their projects include cutting edge gestural interfaces, mobile media experiments, innovative websites and augmented reality pieces. The presentations will be moderated by Holly Willis, the IML’s Director of Academic Programs.

For further information, please contact the IML at 213.743.4421, or visit the symposium Web site.

Digital Studies Symposium: Anne Bray

Anne Bray is a leading curator, media artist and educator, and has played a prominent role supporting alternative media in Los Angeles for two decades.  She is also the founder of the 21-year-old media arts festival LA Freewaves, an international, decentralized hub for experimental media art. Bray has exhibited her own artwork at gas stations, malls and movie theaters, as well as on TV, in department stores, on billboards and inside art venues, combining personal and social positions via video, audio and 3-d screens.

Bray will talk about the rise of urban screens in general, and her recently funded project “MetroVoice: About/In/By Los Angeles,” in which youth will collaboratively write and produce geo-coded videos, TV screen banners and messages that will be transmitted to TV screens on the LA Metro buses that travel throughout the city, transforming the buses into mobile learning labs.

.The talk begins at 7:00 and is free and open to students, faculty, and the general public.

About the Symposium

The Digital Studies Symposium is designed to introduce participants to diverse scholarly media-based production. The speakers in this series are artists, programmers, scholars and designers, and their projects include cutting edge gestural interfaces, mobile media experiments, innovative websites and augmented reality pieces. The presentations will be moderated by Holly Willis, the IML’s Director of Academic Programs.

For further information, please contact the IML at 213.743.4421, or visit the symposium Web site.

Digital Studies Symposium: Natalie Bookchin

Natalie Bookchin’s video installations address conditions of global connectivity and the impact of everyday uses of new technologies on the stories we tell about ourselves and the world. Her work is exhibited widely, including at LACMA, PS1, Mass MOCA, the Generali Foundation, the Walker Art Center, the Pompidou Centre, MOCA Los Angeles, the Whitney Museum, the Tate, and Creative Time. She has received numerous grants and awards, including from Creative Capital, California Arts Council, the Guggenheim Foundation, the Durfee Foundation, the Rockefeller Foundation, California Community Foundation, New York State Council for the Arts, Daniel Langlois Foundation, a COLA Artist Fellowship and most recently an Artistic Innovation Award from Center for Cultural Innovation. Bookchin studied at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, the Whitney Independent Study Program, and SUNY Purchase. In 1999-2000 Bookchin organized , an eight month series of lectures and workshops on art, activism and the Internet at CalArts, MOCA in LA, and Laboratorio Cinematek in Tijuana . She lives and works in Los Angeles, where she is co-Director of the Photography & Media Program in the Art School at CalArts.

Bookchin joins the Digital Studies Symposium to talk about a series of projects centered on the documentary potential of YouTube videos. In her recent installation titled Mass Ornament, for example, Bookchin gathered hundreds of dance videos, studied them, and then arranged them to create a portrait that captures a particular statement about contemporary culture. Bookchin will show her work, talk about her process, and consider new notions of documentary practice and research.The talk begins at 7:00 and is free and open to students, faculty, and the general public.

About the Symposium

The Digital Studies Symposium is designed to introduce participants to diverse scholarly media-based production. The speakers in this series are artists, programmers, scholars and designers, and their projects include cutting edge gestural interfaces, mobile media experiments, innovative websites and augmented reality pieces. The presentations will be moderated by Holly Willis, the IML’s Director of Academic Programs.

For further information, please contact the IML at 213.743.4421, or visit the symposium Web site.

Digital Studies Symposium: Dan Goods

Dan Goods is passionate about giving people experiences where they interact with something beautiful, meaningful, and/or possibly profound. During the day he is the “Visual Strategist” for NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory where he develops creative ways of communicating. His work ranges from art pieces in museums, to ways of communicating to politicians. Installations for JPL include “The Hidden Light”, about finding planets around other stars, and “The Big Playground”, in which a hole drilled into a grain of sand shows the scale of the universe and the small area in which we have found hundreds of planets around other stars.

Goods co-curated a show called Data + Art: Art and Science in the Age of Information at the PMCA in Pasadena. He recently finished “Solid Smoke”, an installation using a substance called aerogel which is 99.8% air and has been used by NASA to capture dust from a comet, this was shown at the Technorama in Wintertur, Switzerland. Goods is currently developing a 108-foot data driven sculpture for the San Jose Airport and a window installation for the National Academies of Sciences Koshland Museum in Washington D.C..The talk begins at 7:00 and is free and open to students, faculty, and the general public.

About the Symposium

The Digital Studies Symposium is designed to introduce participants to diverse scholarly media-based production. The speakers in this series are artists, programmers, scholars and designers, and their projects include cutting edge gestural interfaces, mobile media experiments, innovative websites and augmented reality pieces. The presentations will be moderated by Holly Willis, the IML’s Director of Academic Programs.

For further information, please contact the IML at 213.743.4421, or visit the symposium Web site.