Digital Studies Symposium Presents: Eve Marson

Eve Marson is a documentary film producer, and has worked on both feature films and a series of highly effective web-based videos. Over the past years she has worked on a variety of feature documentaries, including Bigger, Stronger, Faster, and television programming, including Discovery Channel’s The Joy of Lex. Eve also served as producer on an informational web series for GOOD Video’s 2008 election coverage.

Most recently Eve spent a grueling year studying genocide and filming on site around the world as associate producer for the PBS feature documentary Worse Than War. She also is producing the documentary film Craigslist Joe, an exploration and social experiment surrounding the online market community. At the symposium, Eve will discuss tactics for creating highly effective web videos.

The talk begins at 7:00 in SCA 112 and is free and open to students, faculty, and the general public.

About the Symposium
The Digital Studies Symposium is both a course (IML 466) and a public forum designed to introduce participants to diverse examples of scholarly media-based projects and practices. The speakers in this series are artists, programmers, scholars and designers, and their projects include cutting edge gestural interfaces, mobile media experiments, innovative websites, games and augmented reality experiments. The presentations are moderated by Holly Willis, the IML’s Director of Academic Programs.

Continuing Students

This page is for undergraduate students who are returning to the IML. If you are a new IML undergraduate student, please click here. If you are a graduate student, please click here.



STUDENT RESOURCES

IML Portal – All IML students may use the IML portal to check out equipment and materials, browse the library, and view lab calendars. The portal is also the entry point for students to access the wiki and blog for their registered courses.

Honors Program Requirements – Students who are pursuing the Honors Program may refer here for program requirements.

Digital Studies Minor Requirements – Students who are pursuing the Digital Studies Minor may refer here for program requirements.

IML Facebook Page – check here for event and announcement updates from the IML.



COURSES

Click here to see a list of IML courses. Each page includes a course description, a list of upcoming course sections and a sample syllabus.

For a complete listing of courses offered in each semester, students may also refer to the USC Schedule of Classes (Spring 2012 link here). The Schedule of Classes lists each course with the corresponding day and time, room number, instructor and sample syllabus. For specific questions regarding a course, students may contact the faculty member directly or contact Sonia Seetharaman, Academic Program Coordinator.

**Undergraduate students may also take graduate-level courses, pending advisor and faculty approval from the IML. Undergraduates may contact Sonia Seetharaman for more information.



PROGRAMS

Students who are planning to take more than one IML course should consider pursuing an IML program. The IML offers two programs to undergraduate students: the Minor in Digital Studies and the Honors in Multimedia Scholarship. Neither of these programs stands alone; they are meant to complement a student’s major discipline. Most students choose to declare a program after taking their first IML course – students may also wait longer if necessary, but it is not encouraged. Declared students will receive first priority in advising, as well as first consideration in student research opportunities.

Honors in Multimedia Scholarship: The Honors Program is a 16-unit program. After completing preparatory coursework, students create a media-rich Honors thesis project to earn the Honors designation. The subject of the Honors thesis project is chosen based on the student’s major. To learn more about the requirements for the Honors Program, click here.

Minor in Digital Studies: The Minor in Digital Studies is a 20-unit program. The Minor has no capstone or thesis requirement – students need only complete the required courses in order to obtain the Minor. To learn more about the requirements for the Minor, click here.



QUESTIONS?

If you would like more information about IML courses and programs, or you have specific questions, please contact:

Sonia Seetharaman
Academic Program Coordinator
USC Institute for Multimedia Literacy
sseetharaman@cinema.usc.edu
(213) 743-2198

Graduate Students

This page is for graduate students who are new or returning to the IML. If you are a new IML undergraduate student, please click here. If you are a continuing IML undergraduate student, please click here.

The IML offers graduate level courses that focus on digital media theory and practice, introducing students to an array of authoring tools, in addition to special topics such as tangible computing, information visualization and digital pedagogies. Students from any USC Master’s, professional or doctoral program are eligible to take IML graduate-level coursework. No prior media experience is required; instead, students should possess an interest in and passion for innovative scholarship and research practices.

**Undergraduate students may also take graduate-level courses, pending advisor and faculty approval from the IML. Undergraduates may contact Sonia Seetharaman, Academic Program Coordinator, for more information.



GRADUATE COURSES

Click to learn more about each IML graduate course:

IML 500 Digital Media Tools and Tactics
IML 501 Seminar in Contemporary Digital Media
IML 535 Tangible Computing in the Humanities and Sciences
IML 555 Digital Pedagogies


400-level courses: Graduate students are also permitted to enroll in 400-level coursework at the IML. However, students are encouraged to consult their faculty advisors or department chairs prior to enrolling in any 400-level course, as certain graduate programs may restrict 400-level enrollment. For a listing of 400-level IML courses, click here.

For a complete listing of courses offered in each semester, students may also refer to the USC Schedule of Classes (Spring 2012 link here). The Schedule of Classes lists each course with the corresponding day and time, room number, instructor and sample syllabus. For specific questions regarding a course, students may contact the faculty member directly or contact Sonia Seetharaman, Academic Program Coordinator.



GRADUATE RESOURCES

IML Portal – All IML students may use the IML portal to check out equipment and materials, browse the library, and view lab calendars. The portal is also the entry point for students to access the wiki and blog for their registered courses.

IML Facebook Page – check here for event and announcement updates from the IML.



QUESTIONS?

If you would like more information about IML courses and programs, or you have specific questions, please contact:

Sonia Seetharaman
Academic Program Coordinator
USC Institute for Multimedia Literacy
sseetharaman@cinema.usc.edu
(213) 743-2198

Mobility Shifts Workshop, Hacking the Classroom: Mobilizing Formal + Informal Learning for the Millenial Classroom

Along with my colleagues Elisa Kriesinger, bonnie lenore kyburz, Matthew Kim and Joyce Walker, I conducted a workshop  on 10/15/2011 at the Mobility Shifts conference in NY.  It was a wonderful event and the participants were fabulous.

Computational Aesthetics

Event Schedule and Locations:

Lecture and Screening: 7:00 p.m., Monday, October 17, 2011
SCA 112, George Lucas Building
School of Cinematic Arts
900 W. 34th St., Los Angeles, CA 90007

Workshop: 11:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m., Friday, October 21, 2011
Blue Lab
Institute for Multimedia Literacy
746 West Adams Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90089

About the Event

Computational Aesthetics, funded by USC’s Visions & Voices Arts and Humanities Initiative, combines a lecture, screening and workshop designed to explore computational aesthetics broadly. The lecture by Chandler McWilliams, co-author of the recently published Form + Code in Design, Art and Architecture, will describe computational aesthetics and provide a context, and show specific examples of code as visual expression.

The 50-minute screening consists of short-form videos works that ask how the computational capacity of the computer has impacted our most basic conceptions of image, sound and storytelling.

The workshop will focus on the relationship between code (computer programs) and visual form. The event is centered around six themes, Designing with Numbers, Repetition, Parameterization, Visualization, Transformation and Simulation. Using these themes, we will discuss procedural and algorithmic work from architecture, design, and fine art and use these examples as jumping off points to introduce the basics of computer programming with particular emphasis on creating software for the screen. Each participant will have the opportunity to work with sample programs relevant to each of the six themes.

About Chandler McWilliams

Chandler B. McWilliams is an artist, programmer and writer. He has studied film, photography and political science, and completed graduate work in philosophy at The New School for Social Research in New York City. McWilliams is the co-author of Form + Code in Design, Art and Architecture (Princeton Architectural Press, 2010). He lives in Los Angeles where he teaches in the department of Design Media Arts at the UCLA School of the Arts. His current work focuses on themes of affect, repetition, computation and epistemology.

Digital Studies Symposium Presents: Column Five

“As the world move faster each day, it is necessary to communicate your message in a quick, clear and engaging way that sets it apart from the noise.”

This message, displayed on the home page of Column Five Media, is a brief declaration of their company’s purpose – to develop creative, poignant and effective strategies of communicating information, whether through infographics, data visualization or interactive experiences. Some of Column Five’s clients include GOOD Magazine, MySpace, GE, Nokia, Mint.com, PlayStation and Travelocity.

Two of Column Five’s co-founders, Jason Lankow and Ross Crooks, will come and talk about information visualization generally, and the expertise of their company in particular.

The talk begins at 7:00 in SCA 112 and is free and open to students, faculty, and the general public.

About the Symposium
The Digital Studies Symposium is both a course (IML 466) and a public forum designed to introduce participants to diverse examples of scholarly media-based projects and practices. The speakers in this series are artists, programmers, scholars and designers, and their projects include cutting edge gestural interfaces, mobile media experiments, innovative websites, games and augmented reality experiments. The presentations are moderated by Holly Willis, the IML’s Director of Academic Programs.

Get Your Hands Dirty with the Arts – Gigapixel Photography

Instructor: David Lopez
1:30 pm to 4:30 pm
Taper Lab – Yellow (B4)

The USC arts schools, including the School of Architecture, the School of Cinematic Arts, the Roski School of Fine Arts and the School of Theatre, will come together to present a dynamic daylong festival featuring unique opportunities to get your hands dirty with the arts. They will present a diverse array of hands-on workshops, from salsa dancing to ceramics to digital media-making. So get your hands dirty and experience the creativity and thrill of making art firsthand with USC’s distinguished faculty.

Learn how to create incredibly detailed photographs you don’t simply view, but explore. Using standard megapixel cameras and free software, attendees will learn the basics of framing, shooting, assembling and sharing a gigapixel image.

For more information and to make a reservation, visit the USC Visions and Voices website.

Get Your Hands Dirty with the Arts – DIY Cinematography

Instructor: Gabriel Peters-Lazaro
9:30 am to 12:30 pm
Taper Lab – Red (B6)

The USC arts schools, including the School of Architecture, the School of Cinematic Arts, the Roski School of Fine Arts and the School of Theatre, will come together to present a dynamic daylong festival featuring unique opportunities to get your hands dirty with the arts. They will present a diverse array of hands-on workshops, from salsa dancing to ceramics to digital media-making. So get your hands dirty and experience the creativity and thrill of making art firsthand with USC’s distinguished faculty.

This popular workshop shows participants how to get great shots with inexpensive video cameras and available light. Learn the fundamentals of digital cinematography, and then gain a tool-set of simple tricks and techniques you can use for real world situations. This year’s workshop adds green screen compositing techniques.

For more information and to make a reservation, visit the USC Visions and Voices website.

Get Your Hands Dirty with the Arts – Talk. Look. Listen. Repeat: The Story/Image Pitch

Instructor: Stacy Patterson
9:30 am to 12:30 pm
Taper Lab – Yellow (B4)

The USC arts schools, including the School of Architecture, the School of Cinematic Arts, the Roski School of Fine Arts and the School of Theatre, will come together to present a dynamic daylong festival featuring unique opportunities to get your hands dirty with the arts. They will present a diverse array of hands-on workshops, from salsa dancing to ceramics to digital media-making. So get your hands dirty and experience the creativity and thrill of making art firsthand with USC’s distinguished faculty.

We all have a story to tell, a thought to share, a personal connection to make. However, in this fast-paced world, we often find ourselves with only moments to captivate our listeners and engage them to participate. This workshop will provide the tools and exercises to tell your story, albeit a very short story, one with three spoken sentences and only three still images that you will choose and put together in the lab. Think of it as a multi-media “elevator pitch.”

For more information and to make a reservation, visit the USC Visions and Voices website.

Future of the Internets: NMC Plenary Address